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Maria Obuchowska-Morzycka’s journey to Siberian Arcadia

Wiesław Caban, Lidia Michalska-Bracha: Maria Obuchowska-Morzycka followed her husband into Siberian exile in 1863.

She lit the light of hope. The extraordinary fate of Zofia Teliga-Mertens, PhD, and her family

Wojciech Marciniak The story of Zofia Teliga-Mertens, who, did not spare her health and her own money and wanted to open the way to the homeland for Poles in the East. She persistently overcame financial difficulties, procedural problems and the lack of sensitivity of...

The fate of the deportees in the commandant’s notebook

Daniel Boćkowski: Two ordinary school notebooks containing a dozen or so pages of tables and statistical summaries turned out to be an invaluable source of knowledge about the rules governing the small special settlements to which deportees were sent by the Soviets in 1940 and 1941.

Resettled in Africa on the way to Poland

Resettled in Africa on the way to Poland

Adam Czesław Dobroński: A total of 19 Polish settlements were set up in Africa, with more than 20,000 Polish citizens living in them. They arrived by sea transport from Persia to the ports of Mombasa, Tanga and Dar es Salam, Mozambique, and from there were transported inland.

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A Passenger on the Philosophers’ steamer

A Passenger on the Philosophers’ steamer

Sergei Lebedev: I am standing on the quay in the Polish city of Szczecin. The north wind from the Baltic Sea brings a thick gray drizzle that envelops the buildings and the port cranes, creating a sense of stagnant timelessness. A tugboat on the Oder River, almost hidden by the curtain of rain and turned into a fluid silhouette, gives a loud, long blast of its horn and vanishes in the fog. But the horn still sounds, an echo out of the past.

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Sandarmokh: Dramaturgy of meanings

Sandarmokh: Dramaturgy of meanings

Irina Flige: The Polish cross, as the Catholic cross is often called in Russia, was one of the first to appear in Sandarmokh – on the day of the opening of the Memorial Cemetery for Victims of Terror. Only those who really wanted to be ready on time – on the important day of the sixtieth anniversary of the Great Terror – could make it in such a short time.

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The stone chair of Bolek Augustis

The stone chair of Bolek Augustis

Urszula Dąbrowska: The four volunteers from Bialystok crossed 12 time zones (twice), flew over 20,000 km. They visited the North and South Island, travelling about 2,500 km by car to meet with more than a hundred representatives of the local Polish community in three of New Zealand’s largest cities: Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

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Remembering the Gulag

Remembering the Gulag

‘I don’t want anything. I won’t say anything’, the old man blurted out. ‘If I tell you, you’ll leave, and then what? They’ll send me back to the camps?’ – Elena Racheva writes about the complicated memory of GULag in modern Russia.

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What can literature do?

What can literature do?

Włodzimierz Bolecki: If Mackiewicz’s and Herling’s books had been confined to recording Soviet crimes, they would probably have been mere illustrations of the information that circulated in the international public sphere at the time. Meanwhile, both Mackiewicz and Herling wrote their books with the intention of showing the reality they encountered in the Soviets as a universal threat to all people. They treated Katyn and Yertsevo as names whose horror should speak to every human being.

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