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Logo Muzeum Pamięci Sybiru w Białymstoku
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Logo Muzeum Pamięci Sybiru w Białymstoku
Logo Muzeum Pamięci Sybiru w Białymstoku
Logo Muzeum Pamięci Sybiru w Białymstoku

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“When they turn the land into a desert, they announce that they have brought peace”

Ryszard Kulesza: Probably all over the world, in all places on earth, from ancient times to the most recent, smaller and larger empires have used deportations.

Historical policy in Russia as a substitute for state ideology

Jan Rachinskij: Today, history politics occupies roughly the same place in Russia as ideology did in Soviet times. And it is not just about imposing state-approved interpretations of events.

“Our stolen youth weeping for its stolen homeland” (Dalia Grinkevičiūtė) – A child´s memories of deportation from Lithuania to Siberia

Vytenė Muschick: Dalia, her brother Juozas, and her parents were deported to Siberia from their hometown of Kaunas during the first mass deportations on 14 June 1941. She was 14 years old at the time and her brother Juozas was 17. That deportation consisted of over 12,000 people; 5,060 of these were children, and 863 more children were later born in exile

The fate of the deportees in the commandant’s notebook

The fate of the deportees in the commandant’s notebook

Daniel Boćkowski: Two ordinary school notebooks containing a dozen or so pages of tables and statistical summaries turned out to be an invaluable source of knowledge about the rules governing the small special settlements to which deportees were sent by the Soviets in 1940 and 1941.

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Resettled in Africa on the way to Poland

Resettled in Africa on the way to Poland

Adam Czesław Dobroński: A total of 19 Polish settlements were set up in Africa, with more than 20,000 Polish citizens living in them. They arrived by sea transport from Persia to the ports of Mombasa, Tanga and Dar es Salam, Mozambique, and from there were transported inland.

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A Passenger on the Philosophers’ steamer

A Passenger on the Philosophers’ steamer

Sergei Lebedev: I am standing on the quay in the Polish city of Szczecin. The north wind from the Baltic Sea brings a thick gray drizzle that envelops the buildings and the port cranes, creating a sense of stagnant timelessness. A tugboat on the Oder River, almost hidden by the curtain of rain and turned into a fluid silhouette, gives a loud, long blast of its horn and vanishes in the fog. But the horn still sounds, an echo out of the past.

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Towards the dreamed Motherland

Towards the dreamed Motherland

Wojciech Marciniak: The deportations of Polish citizens deep into the USSR, carried out in four rounds between 1940 and 1941, had features of ethnic cleansing. Through these deportations, the Stalinist regime pursued a plan to remove the Polish population from “Western Ukraine” and “Western Belarus” and to Sovietise these areas. Over 320,000 citizens of the Second Polish Republic were deprived not only of their homes, but also of their previous lives, their sense of security, their children’s education, their development and the fulfilment of their dreams. What kept many of them alive was the hope that one day they would be able to return to their homeland.

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Sandarmokh: Dramaturgy of meanings

Sandarmokh: Dramaturgy of meanings

Irina Flige: The Polish cross, as the Catholic cross is often called in Russia, was one of the first to appear in Sandarmokh – on the day of the opening of the Memorial Cemetery for Victims of Terror. Only those who really wanted to be ready on time – on the important day of the sixtieth anniversary of the Great Terror – could make it in such a short time.

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The stone chair of Bolek Augustis

The stone chair of Bolek Augustis

Urszula Dąbrowska: The four volunteers from Bialystok crossed 12 time zones (twice), flew over 20,000 km. They visited the North and South Island, travelling about 2,500 km by car to meet with more than a hundred representatives of the local Polish community in three of New Zealand’s largest cities: Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

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